Monday, August 7, 2017

Daily Corrections Clips


CALIFORNIA INMATES

Rachel Engel, Efficient Gov

Expansion of CALPIA’s computer coding program aims to lower recidivism rates by providing rehabilitation and job opportunities to female inmates.

In a joint venture between the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) and the California Prison Industry (CALPIA), the successful computer coding program initiated at Sam Quentin State Prison by the non-profit The Last Mile (TLM) in 2015 will expand to the California Institution for Women (CIW).

Greenfield News

SOLEDAD — A California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation inmate who walked away from the minimum-support facility at Salinas Valley State Prison on Aug. 2 was apprehended Saturday morning in Linda, in Yuba County.

At about 9:20 a.m. on Aug. 5, officers from the Yuba City Police Department spotted Donald Likens as he was riding a bicycle, recognizing him from a flyer that was distributed by agents from the department’s Special Service Unit. Likens was quickly taken into custody without incident and will be returned to the prison in Soledad.

Ninety-nine percent of escaped offenders have been apprehended since 1977, said CDCR officials
Cassia Pollock, NBC 7 San Diego

An inmate escaped a rehabilitation program, ditching his GPS tracker and taking off in San Diego, confirmed state officials.

The authorities are searching for 24-year-old Quincy Crawford, who fled the Male Community Re-entry Program (MCRP) facility on Thursday, according to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR).

DEATH PENALTY

Hattie Xu, The Sacramento Bee

While the state of Arkansas made news earlier this year when it executed four inmates in eight days, California has not seen an execution since 2006, according to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.

Of the 123 deaths of inmates who were on California’s death row since 1978, just 15 were from execution, according to data from CDCR. A majority – 60 percent – died of natural causes, while another 20 percent committed suicide.

On average, inmates who were sentenced in the Sacramento region have waited on death row for 21 years, according to data from CDCR. Sixty-six percent of them have waited for more than 20 years. While two inmates were condemned to death just three years ago, one – Joe Johnson – has been waiting for 36 years.

CALIFORNIA PRISONS

Bob Egelko, San Francisco Chronicle

As President Trump calls for reinstatement of a ban on transgender military service — a ban his predecessor repealed a year ago — another large institution, the California prison system, is going through a court-supervised overhaul of policies on gender identity.

Having complied with a federal judge’s order to allow the nation’s first sex-reassignment operation for a prisoner, the state Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation is now struggling to implement new rules for hundreds of transgender inmates — the clothing they are issued, the medical care they receive and the prisons to which they are assigned.

PROPOSITION 57

Kelly Davis, Voice Of San Diego

How do you define “violent crime”? That’s the question dogging the implementation of Prop. 57, the 2016 ballot measure that sought to ease state prison overcrowding by making nonviolent offenders eligible for early parole consideration.

The measure passed easily despite arguments by law enforcement groups that the legal definition of a nonviolent felony is too broad — rape, for instance, isn’t considered a violent felony under California penal code — and voters were being misled.

CORRECTIONS RELATED

Laura Urseny, Chico Enterprise-Record

NOTE: Several Butte County parolees participated in the program.

Chico >> When the boot camp started, some knew how to handle sheets of drywall, while others didn’t know how to read a tape measure.

In the end, the seven graduates of Boot Camp for Construction Skills were ready for their reward — two weeks of sweat, nails and dust, working for a Butte County contractor.

They aren’t even thinking about the heat they’ll endure during August. What they’re anticipating is a possible job in construction.