Monday, November 21, 2016

Daily Corrections Clips

CALIFORNIA INMATES

Shirin Rajaee, CBS Sacramento

SACRAMENTO (CBS13) – Military men and women and prison inmates are coming together for a first-of-its-kind program in California, if not the country.

Seventeen inmates at California Medical Facility state prison in Vacaville were carefully vetted to participate in the military assistance program, known as MAP.

The inmates, many of them former military, are helping deter airmen from Travis Air Force Base from a life of crime and imprisonment.

Josh Copitch, KRCR News

REDDING, Calif. - The Shasta County District Attorney's Office has completed their review and evaluation of the California Supreme Court's reversal of the death penalty sentence in the Gary Grimes case, in which they concluded that they will not seek a retrial of the death penalty.

Pursuant to California law, Grimes' sentence will automatically default to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Grimes was originally found guilty of the 1995 murder of 98-year-old Betty Bone and sentenced to death in January of 1999. Besides Grimes, two other suspects were arrested: John Morris and Patrick Wilson. The murder occurred after the three suspects forcibly entered the victim's house for the purpose of committing a burglary.

CORRECTIONS RELATED

Proposition 57 expands on existing court orders that helped reduce prison population
KCRA 3 News

Voters' approval of Gov. Jerry Brown's sentencing reform initiative may finally give California the long-term solution it needs to end a decade-long legal battle over prison conditions that twice reached the U.S. Supreme Court and has cost taxpayers billions of dollars.

Proposition 57 was pitched as a safety valve to reduce an inmate population that is steadily increasing despite state efforts to shift felons from overcrowded state prisons into equally burdened county jails over the past five years.

Don Thompson, The Associated Press

SACRAMENTO – Voters’ approval of Gov. Jerry Brown’s sentencing reform initiative may give California the long-term solution it needs to end a decadelong legal battle over prison conditions that twice reached the U.S. Supreme Court and has cost taxpayers billions.

Proposition 57 was pitched as a safety valve to reduce an inmate population that is steadily increasing despite state efforts to shift felons from overcrowded state prisons into equally burdened county jails over the past five years.

The initiative incorporates rules into the state Constitution to speed up how quickly felons can be paroled. It also grants the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation broad discretion to give more early release credits to inmates who complete rehabilitation programs.

States are weighing whether solitary confinement, or segregated or restrictive housing, creates more problems than it solves.
Teresa Wiltz, The Huffington Post

Last month, New Jersey lawmakers voted to stop isolating prison inmates for as long as 23 hours a day for months or years on end after deciding it was abusive and hampered a return to society.

California has begun moving nearly 2,000 prisoners out of solitary confinement as part of a settlement of a 2009 lawsuit brought by inmates who’d been on an extended hunger strike. Many of the prisoners had been placed in solitary confinement units because they were believed to be in a gang. Many had been in the units for decades. So far, the state has moved 1,557 inmates out of solitary units, said Scott Kernan, secretary of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. Prison officials have to carefully review each case before transferring an inmate into the general population, Kernan said. “It’s been a monumental task,” he said. “It’s so fraught with potential danger, if you let out an inmate and something bad happens.”