Monday, August 8, 2016

Daily Corrections Clips


CALIFORNIA INMATES

Pilot fire chars 4,500 acres near Silverwood Lake, prompting aggressive response. Official say wildfire is 5 percent contained as of 7 a.m. Monday.
The Press-Enterprise

A wildfire fire burning in the San Bernardino Mountains covered 4,500 acres Monday morning, Cal Fire officials say.

The fire, dubbed the Pilot fire, ignited Sunday afternoon and had reached 1,500 about eight hours later. Firefighters had the fire 5 percent contained by 7 a.m., officials said.

The 3,000-acre jump, from the 1,500 acres reported late Sunday night, could be due to inaccurate first-day figures.

Cal Fire spokesman Eric Sherwin said firefighters worked throughout the night to keep the flames away from homes. The fire died down overnight but was expected to become more active during the day, when winds pick up and temperatures rise.

The exact number of people evacuated since the fire started wasn’t immediately clear Monday morning.

Cal Coast News

The U.S. Department of Education has chosen Cuesta College as one of five California colleges to participate in a pilot program with a goal of reducing recidivism for inmates through education.

As part of the Second Chance Pell Pilot Program, beginning in the spring of 2017, selected California Men’s Colony (CMC) inmates will receive Pell Grant funds to cover the costs of Cuesta College courses and books. Cuesta College expects to have 250 students at the CMC enrolled in a 21-course program that leads to a transferable degree in sociology.

Students will be taught in-person by Cuesta College instructors working at the CMC.

Dianne Reber Hart, Santa Rosa Press Democrat

Some of the latest artwork to emerge in Sonoma Valley isn’t on canvas or part of a juried show. It’s on white paper bags, the type used to pack lunches.

The paper sack artists aren’t part of a trendy new class or experiment in self-expression. They are prison inmates, some serving life sentences, with the time and talent to create art for a cause.

Their original artwork, done in everything from crayons to acrylics, is part of an American Cancer Society fundraiser. The bags will circle a school track during an overnight Relay for Life event, each glowing by candlelight as a luminaria dedicated to someone battling or lost to cancer.

Lillian Dong, The Daily Californian

The California State Assembly passed a state Senate bill Thursday that will allow prisoners in Security Housing Units, or SHUs, to be eligible for early release based on good behavior.

The bill, SB 759, will also be applied to prisoners in psychiatric services and administrative segregation units and repeals an earlier provision that made prisoners in SHUs — also known as solitary confinement — ineligible to earn credits. Credits allow for earlier releases and are gained by staying “discipline-free” and by participating in rehabilitative programs.

Jamie Moddelmog, Vanguard Court Watch

The trial of Vernon Earl Rubidoux commenced Friday morning with Judge Samuel T. McAdams presiding.  Rubidoux had been charged with a crime in 2007 in which he threatened a civilian with a knife, and had been found “not guilty by verdict of insanity”. He is currently in a mental health facility and has reached the end of the maximum sentence available.

The People have requested an “extension of commitment”, maintaining that Mr. Rubidoux poses a substantial danger of physical harm to others as a result of a metal defect, disease or disorder.  Under California Criminal Code 3453, to be succeed in getting Mr. Rubidoux an extension of commitment, they must prove:

CALIFORNIA PAROLE

Sean Emery, OC Register

One of Orange County’s most notorious killers will remain behind bars. Gov. Jerry Brown has again overturned a parole board decision that a man who took part in a devil cult murder rampage is suitable for release.

The call to keep Arthur Craig “Moose” Hulse in prison follows a letter-writing campaign led by relatives of Santa Ana gas station attendant Jerry Wayne Carlin, 20, who along with El Toro teacher Nancy Brown, 29, was killed in 1970 by the Sons of Satan motorcycle gang.

DEATH PENALTY

Adam Randall, Daily Journal

Two differing propositions on the November ballot could change the state’s death penalty by either abolishing it or expediting executions.

Mendocino County has only had two cases of an offender being sentenced to death, and seven life-without-parole convictions.

Robert Danielson committed suicide in 1995 while on San Quentin’s death row after a jury found him guilty of the 1982 Manchester killings of Benjamin and Edith Shaffer, who had been camping in their motor home on the coast when they were shot execution style.

Richard Dean Clark is still on death row after he was found guilty in 1987 of the July 1985 rape, stabbing and bludgeoning of Rosie Grover, 15, of Ukiah.

CORRECTIONS RELATED

Action News Now

The City of Oroville is a little safer today thanks to some unlikely help.

Out in Oroville today, the sheriff's office responded to several homeless camps with the help of 21 inmates

“We've cleaned up in Butte County 150 camps this year and roughly 500 yards of debris have been hauled to landfill," said Kevin Tuck, correctional deputy with Butte County Sheriff’s Office.

There's not much to salvage.

Stephanie Weldy, Marin Independent Journal

Marin City males gathered Saturday to discuss what defines a man.

At the Marin City Recreational Center, more than 100 boys, young men and seniors, predominately of African-American descent, danced, listened and shared at the “IMan Summit: Measuring Manhood.”

“It’s usually a father that tells his son when he’s a man, based on what he taught him or the growth he’s observed over time and the responsibilities he’s given him,” said Rev. Rondall Leggett, an event organizer and senior pastor at Marin City’s First Missionary Baptist Church. “What happens when you don’t have a father? Do your friends tell you how to be a man. It needs to be another man.”

Barry Brown, KION

GREENFIELD, Calif. - South Monterey County police officers arrested one man and seized cash and drugs Tuesday after serving separate search warrants in Greenfield and King City.

The Greenfield Police Department said anonymous information led them to arrest Samuel Juarez Martinez, 30, on suspicion of selling illegal narcotics. Investigators say there may be additional suspects.

Officers from the King City Police Department and the California Department of Corrections assisted in the arrest.

Ryan McCarthy, Daily Republic

FAIRFIELD — The CIA and the California Department of Corrections created the Symbionese Liberation Army of the 1970s, contends a new book that also claims it’s possible SLA leader Donald DeFreeze underwent psychosurgery at the California Medical Facility in Vacaville.

Implementing electrodes into DeFreeze is speculation but not beyond the realm of possibility, author Brad Schreiber writes.

Los Angeles resident Schreiber was interviewed Wednesday night on a national radio show about his book “Revolution’s End: The Patty Hearst Kidnapping, Mind Control and the Secret History of Donald DeFreeze and the SLA.”

Measure that reclassified many felonies as misdemeanors is having some of its intended effects – and some unintended ones.
Brian Rokos, The Press-Enterprise

The premise behind the Safe Neighborhoods and Schools Act, or Prop. 47, overwhelmingly approved by California voters in November 2014, was simple:

Reduce the penalties for non-serious, non-violence offenses such as drug possession and minor theft, and pass along the savings from less-crowded prisons and jails to programs that would reduce recidivism and crime and help victims.

But nothing about Prop. 47 has been simple in the 21 months since then.

OPINION

Paul Karrer, The Californian

My routine after a visit to Salinas Valley State Prison is to detox in a fast food joint, usually in Gonzales. Gonzales is larger than a village but smaller than a city. Like Soledad, it’s a sweltering, dusty, flat, Latino-majority farm town.

I stop at Dairy Queen, and am annoyed at my lack of anger at what has just transpired. But I think, at least I wasn’t passive AND sheepish. It is such an ordeal to visit. Wear the right clothes, be an hour early, pray there isn’t a lockdown, hope the Correction Officers are in a decent mood, hope there isn’t a screw up, hope there isn’t willful maliciousness, hope, hope, hope.