Monday, August 1, 2016

Daily Corrections Clips

CALIFORNIA PRISONS

Avianne Tan, abc News

A group of inmates at a California state prison are providing shelter, care and love for dozens of deaf dogs that were recently forced to evacuate a nearby shelter threatened by a wildfire.

Nearly 50 dogs at the Deaf Dogs Rescue of America in Acton, California, were evacuated this past Sunday evening after the shelter's directors -- Lisa Tipton and her husband Mark Tipton -- noticed flames from the Sand Fire blowing in their direction.

"We're pretty high up on a hill and we didn't want to take a chance on floating embers 'cause all it takes is one to light this whole place up," Lisa Tipton told ABC News today. She said she called dozens of local centers, shelters and other rescues, but only the California State Prison in Los Angeles County offered to take all the dogs, no questions asked.

Erin Tracy, The Modesto Bee

The knife-wielding man who was shot by an off-duty correctional officer at Costco on Thursday had been released from Doctors Behavioral Health Center two hours before the shooting, his sister said.

Gary Harlan Scott, 61, was suicidal and had spent most of July in the hospital, said sister Suzanne Perez.

Perez went to pick up her brother when he was discharged from DBHC about 3 p.m. Thursday, but he refused to go with her. She said Scott told her he wanted to kill himself, so she called police, but he got on a bus and left the area before they arrived.

CALIFORNIA INMATES

KQED

Once known only as a violent and dangerous place, San Quentin State Prison now has some of the most innovative rehabilitation programs in the California prison system. We get an inside look at a program where inmates write and perform their own stories. We’ll also hear from Dionne Wilson, a victims' rights advocate whose husband was murdered, and from former San Quentin inmate Troy Williams.

Linda Meilink, Paradise Post

Claire Braz-Valentine goes where few women have ever gone: down of the halls of the men’s High Desert State Prison in Susanville to teach male inmates to get in touch with their sensitive side.

Along with her partner, Anthony Peyton Porter of Chico, she travels to Susanville every Wednesday during the school year to encourage hard-core offenders to learn new ways to express themselves.

Victoria Law, Truthout

Wednesday, July 27, should have been the day that 27-year-old Shaylene Graves walked out of prison a free woman. After eight years in prison, Graves, known as Light Blue or simply Blue to her friends, was looking forward to her first meal out of prison and the welcome-home party her family was planning.

Her family never got to throw that party. At 6:30 am on June 1, Graves' mom Sheri was sitting in her car waiting for her oldest son Michael. As they did every weekday morning, the two were planning to drive from their home in Corona to Irvine where Sheri worked as a nurse and Michael as a barber. As she was backing the car out of the driveway, Sheri's cell phone rang. On the other line was an officer at the California Institution for Women (CIW), the prison where Shaylene was finishing her sentence. He told Sheri that her daughter was dead.

Michael grabbed the phone and asked how his sister had died. "He said, and you can quote me on this, 'We found her hanging. She hung herself,'" Michael told Truthout.

Kristin M. Kraemer, Tri City Herald

A California man faces at least 50 years in prison after terrorizing a Kennewick family five years ago when he forced his way into their home and ordered the father to open his jewelry store.

Vicente Guizar Figueroa, 21, already is doing 30 years in a Southern California prison for a nearly identical robbery outside Bakersfield.

And he and his brother are charged in Yakima with a similar crime involving the owner of a pawn shop in January 2011.

Cathy Locke, The Sacramento Bee

A Nevada City woman convicted in a tax fraud scheme involving California prison inmates has been sentenced to 21 months in federal prison.

Judy Ruth Mullin, 27, was sentenced Friday by U.S. District Judge Garland E. Burrell Jr. and ordered to pay $219,984 in restitution for her role in a conspiracy to defraud the United States with false claims for tax refunds, according to a U.S. Attorney’s Office news release.

Court documents indicate that, beginning in 2011, Mullin and six co-defendants operated a tax fraud scheme out of the California Correctional Center in Susanville. Four co-defendants incarcerated at the correctional center obtained personal identification information of other inmates. That information was provided to Mullin and other co-defendants outside the prison, who prepared and filed false income tax returns with the Internal Revenue Service, claiming refunds that they knew were false and to which the inmates were not entitled.

CORRECTIONS RELATED

Candidate is former San Quentin guard
Lance Armstrong, Citizen

Garrett Smith, a 12-year resident of Elk Grove, became the fourth candidate for mayor of Elk Grove on July 22.

He will challenge Elk Grove Vice Mayor Steve Ly, Elk Grove Planning Commissioner Kevin Spease, and Joel Broussard in this November’s election.

Smith, 50, recalled when he became inspired to run for mayor.

“I read an article in the Citizen that said (Mayor Gary Davis) was stepping down and I figured there was going to be an election, so I said, ‘What the heck? Put my name on the ballot and go from there.’”

SUSD's newest spaniel aces first drug detection challenge
Nicholas Filipas, Record

STOCKTON — A handsome 2-year-old English springer spaniel named Luke leads his handler, Stockton Unified School District police Officer Bobby Page, around the outside of a large school bus.

Don’t scoff at Luke’s small stature. Although he’s not a typical breed used in law enforcement, his smaller frame allows him to duck underneath the massive vehicle to search for hidden narcotics.

Wayne Freedman, abc News

ST. HELENA, Calif. -- In Napa County, the clock continues to tick for a man who is running out of time. The state of California owes Luther Jones almost $1 million for a wrongful death conviction that sent him to state prison for 18 years. But five months have passed, with no check.

The 72-year-old does not have much time left and he knows it. Jones redefines the phrase "victim of the system."