Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Daily Corrections Clips


CALIFORNIA INMATES

ABC 10

Officials with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) are looking for a minimum-security inmate who walked away from the Baseline Conservation Camp, located near the community of Jamestown, in Tuolumne County.

Inmate Daniel Perez, 34, was last seen in his assigned dorm on Sunday, July 10, 2016, at approximately 10:30 p.m. during a routine security check. Camp staff searched the inmate dormitory area, surrounding buildings and the camp perimeter after it was revealed he was missing. All local law enforcement agencies and the California Highway Patrol have been notified and are assisting in the search for Perez. Apprehension efforts are continuing.

The Associated Press
California state corrections officials are investigating the slaying of an inmate during a fight between nearly two dozen inmates at the Calipatria State Prison in Imperial County.
Officials said Monday that the 54-year-old inmate was stabbed repeatedly in the abdomen, chest, head and back by two other inmates Sunday morning

CALIFORNIA PAROLE

Elliot Spagat and Julie Watson, The Associated Press

A man accused of a spate of deadly attacks on San Diego homeless men who were asleep and in some cases set on fire committed a nearly identical crime six years ago.

Anthony Alexander Padgett, 36, now jailed on suspicion of murder, admitted lighting a sleeping man on fire in a supermarket parking lot in January 2010 in the San Diego suburb of National City.

CORRECTIONS RELATED

Sheyanne Romero, Visalia Times Delta

Within a month of breaking ground on Tulare County’s South Valley Detention Facility, a study showed Tulare County as having one of the highest jail populations in California.

The Vera Institute of Justice started The Incarceration Trends Project last year in an effort to advance research and help guide change by providing easily accessible information on the number of people in jail and prison for every county in the nation.

OPINION


Gov. Jerry Brown and the Democratic Legislature have a unique plan to enhance public safety in California. They have reduced the state prison population from close to 150,000 in 2010 to 113,000 now by downgrading what crimes put an offender in prison. Now they are pushing a ballot measure that would enable repeat serious and violent offenders to qualify for early release — to further reduce the state prison population. No worries, though, because they also are passing laws that make it harder or costlier for everyone to buy guns and ammunition.

This month, Brown actually vetoed a bipartisan measure to make stealing a gun a felony. In his veto message, Brown wrote that Assembly Bill 1176 was “nearly identical” to a provision in a gun-control ballot measure championed by Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom. “While I appreciate the authors’ intent in striving to enhance public safety, I feel that the objective is better attained by having the measure appear before the voters only once.” Imagine the outcry if a Republican had vetoed that bill for such bald partisan reasons.