Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Daily Corrections Clips

CALIFORNIA INMATES

Chelcey Adami, The Californian

An inmate at Salinas Valley State Prison was killed on one of the prison’s maximum-security yards just after 11 a.m. this morning.

Two inmates attacked a third inmate with prisoner-made weapons and disregarded orders from correctional officers to stop the attack, according to SVSP.

Officer intervened with chemical agents, and one fired a warning shot from a Mini-14 rifle to help stop the attack.

Cathy Locke, The Sacramento Bee

Q: What happened with John Dillon, who was arrested for the murder of Steven Strother and attempted murder of another individual in Galt?

Nathan, Sacramento

A: John Michael Dillon of Clayton was arrested in the April 12, 2008, shooting death of Steven Strother during a party at a residence in the Galt area.

According to an account in The Sacramento Bee, a fight broke out during the party at a home in the 12800 block of Alabama Road just before 11 p.m. During the fight, Dillon reportedly shot Strother, 25, in the upper body. A second Galt man also was shot in the upper body but survived.

DEATH PENALTY

Manny Lopez, SD News

Actor and long-time human rights activist Mike Farrell was recently in San Diego at the La Jolla home of Bill and Michelle Lerach nto raise funds and awareness about The Justice That Works Act of 2016, an initiative on the November ballot that if passed, will abolish the death penalty in California and convert the sentences of every death row inmate to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Dozens of community members attended the paid event on May 20, to hear the acclaimed actor best known for his eight years on the hit TV show “M*A*S*H” as Capt. B.J. Honeycutt, and five seasons on “Providence” as Dr. Jim Hansen.

CORRECTIONS RELATED

Who knew cell phones had a smell?
Maurice Chammah, The Marshall Project

Two years ago, a Belgian Malinois named Drako earned a flurry of press attention when his proud owners at the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation announced he had found his thousandth contraband cell phone in the state’s prisons. He’d once found thirty stashed in a microwave, and one hidden in a jar of peanut butter.

But Drako was only the most famous of a growing number of dogs around the country trained to find cell phones. Usually they are a specially-trained subset of canine units employed to find drugs. They have been used by prisons in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Ohio, Virginia, and Florida. Texas and California have 13 cell phone dogs each.

Rex Dalton, The Voice of OC

In 2014 when California voters overwhelmingly passed Proposition 47 -- the ballot initiative calling for the release of non-violent drug offenders from state prisons -- they were told more than $100 million would be available for rehabilitation services to prevent recidivism.

Officials in Sacramento estimated state savings from the thousands of newly released inmates would provide the largess for programs aimed at behavioral health, substance abuse, education and crime victims.

But now as Gov. Jerry Brown and the Legislature are crafting the first fund for such programs, the proposed amount is drastically less -- maybe $50 million, depending how much remains in the 2016-17 budget bill to be signed into law by the end of the month.

OPINION

William Drummond, The San Francisco Chronicle

Former Stanford athlete Brock Allen Turner got a mere six-month sentence in county jail after his conviction for raping an unconscious woman behind a campus Dumpster. Criticism from across the country and around the world came down on Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky. Petitions went out to recall the jurist, who said that a longer sentence would possibly ruin Turner’s life. A Change.org recall petition said, “Judge Persky failed to see that the fact that Brock Turner is a white male star athlete at a prestigious university does not entitle him to leniency.”

But was the sentence really lenient, or did the judge inadvertently usher Turner into the lion’s den? County jail in California, even for a three- to six-month term, is no bargain, and Santa Clara County Jail in particular is one of the most dysfunctional in the state. Three guards there were charged with murder last year in the death of a mentally ill inmate. And in February a blue-ribbon commission, after more than a thousand confidential interviews with inmates and staff, found widespread complaints of brutality and physical and verbal abuse by deputies.
CALIFORNIA INMATES

Chelcey Adami, The Californian

An inmate at Salinas Valley State Prison was killed on one of the prison’s maximum-security yards just after 11 a.m. this morning.

Two inmates attacked a third inmate with prisoner-made weapons and disregarded orders from correctional officers to stop the attack, according to SVSP.

Officer intervened with chemical agents, and one fired a warning shot from a Mini-14 rifle to help stop the attack.

Cathy Locke, The Sacramento Bee

Q: What happened with John Dillon, who was arrested for the murder of Steven Strother and attempted murder of another individual in Galt?

Nathan, Sacramento

A: John Michael Dillon of Clayton was arrested in the April 12, 2008, shooting death of Steven Strother during a party at a residence in the Galt area.

According to an account in The Sacramento Bee, a fight broke out during the party at a home in the 12800 block of Alabama Road just before 11 p.m. During the fight, Dillon reportedly shot Strother, 25, in the upper body. A second Galt man also was shot in the upper body but survived.

DEATH PENALTY

Manny Lopez, SD News

Actor and long-time human rights activist Mike Farrell was recently in San Diego at the La Jolla home of Bill and Michelle Lerach nto raise funds and awareness about The Justice That Works Act of 2016, an initiative on the November ballot that if passed, will abolish the death penalty in California and convert the sentences of every death row inmate to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Dozens of community members attended the paid event on May 20, to hear the acclaimed actor best known for his eight years on the hit TV show “M*A*S*H” as Capt. B.J. Honeycutt, and five seasons on “Providence” as Dr. Jim Hansen.

CORRECTIONS RELATED

Who knew cell phones had a smell?
Maurice Chammah, The Marshall Project

Two years ago, a Belgian Malinois named Drako earned a flurry of press attention when his proud owners at the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation announced he had found his thousandth contraband cell phone in the state’s prisons. He’d once found thirty stashed in a microwave, and one hidden in a jar of peanut butter.

But Drako was only the most famous of a growing number of dogs around the country trained to find cell phones. Usually they are a specially-trained subset of canine units employed to find drugs. They have been used by prisons in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Ohio, Virginia, and Florida. Texas and California have 13 cell phone dogs each.

Rex Dalton, The Voice of OC

In 2014 when California voters overwhelmingly passed Proposition 47 -- the ballot initiative calling for the release of non-violent drug offenders from state prisons -- they were told more than $100 million would be available for rehabilitation services to prevent recidivism.

Officials in Sacramento estimated state savings from the thousands of newly released inmates would provide the largess for programs aimed at behavioral health, substance abuse, education and crime victims.

But now as Gov. Jerry Brown and the Legislature are crafting the first fund for such programs, the proposed amount is drastically less -- maybe $50 million, depending how much remains in the 2016-17 budget bill to be signed into law by the end of the month.

OPINION

William Drummond, The San Francisco Chronicle

Former Stanford athlete Brock Allen Turner got a mere six-month sentence in county jail after his conviction for raping an unconscious woman behind a campus Dumpster. Criticism from across the country and around the world came down on Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky. Petitions went out to recall the jurist, who said that a longer sentence would possibly ruin Turner’s life. A Change.org recall petition said, “Judge Persky failed to see that the fact that Brock Turner is a white male star athlete at a prestigious university does not entitle him to leniency.”

But was the sentence really lenient, or did the judge inadvertently usher Turner into the lion’s den? County jail in California, even for a three- to six-month term, is no bargain, and Santa Clara County Jail in particular is one of the most dysfunctional in the state. Three guards there were charged with murder last year in the death of a mentally ill inmate. And in February a blue-ribbon commission, after more than a thousand confidential interviews with inmates and staff, found widespread complaints of brutality and physical and verbal abuse by deputies.