Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Daily Corrections Clips


CDCR NEWS

David Grieder, The Triplicate       

The release of unsettling details regarding California’s prison inmate firefighting program has prompted renewed scrutiny at a state and local level.

Early last week, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation announced it was considering expanding the eligibility criteria for its firefighting program to include inmates convicted of violent felony crimes, rather than only those with non-violent, low-level offenses in their background.

CALIFORNIA INMATES

Jessica Rogness, The Reporter

Inmates at California State Prison, Solano installed a garden of drought-tolerant plants on Monday.

Inside the 2,000 square-foot, fenced-in garden, staff and volunteers will develop an outdoor classroom for inmates to nurture plants through the seasons, and get in touch with their own lifestyle and behavioral changes as well.

Good Day

Michael Marks is visiting with some inmates as they learn some gardening techniques.

Good Day

The Economic Times

Inmates at California State Prison-Solano installed a drought-tolerant garden as part of the Insight Garden program that teaches inmates environmental and gardening skills.

Carmen George, The Fresno Bee

In a prison yard in Chowchilla, surrounded by layers of brick, chain link, razor wire and armed guards, 10 men and five dogs are working to change for the better.

These inmates are the first batch of recruits to a program at Valley State Prison aimed at training dogs from Madera County animal shelter to make them more adoptable.

Carmen George, The Fresno Bee

Inmates at Valley State Prison in Chowchilla are donating more than $4,000 to the Craycroft Cancer Center at Valley Children’s Hospital.

Prison officials said inmates participated in several fundraisers and events this past year to help people battling cancer, including donating hair to Locks of Love and hosting walk-a-thon to collect donations.

CALIFORNIA PAROLE

Meghann M. Cuniff, OC Register

SAN CLEMENTE – A man in prison for his role in a 1993 melee that left a 17-year-old San Clemente boy dead from a paint roller through his head will stay in prison for at least another five years, a parole board ruled Friday.

Rogelio Vasquez Solis, one of two men still in prison for the Oct. 15, 1993, attack at Calafia State Beach, only began taking self-help classes at Calipatria State Prison last year, despite being incarcerated since his arrest, authorities said.

CORRECTIONS RELATED

Tracey Kaplan, Santa Cruz Sentinel

SAN JOSE >> For nearly three years, Santa Clara County has been staffing its jails with as few as two full-time psychiatrists, less than half the number of doctors budgeted to handle the more than 1,500 inmates jail officials say are mentally ill.

But 12 days after mentally ill inmate Michael Tyree was allegedly beaten to death by three jail guards in late August, the county took unusually aggressive steps to bring in more psychiatrists, while continuing to defend its earlier inaction.

Paul Payne, The Press Democrat

A former prison guard from Rohnert Park who served a six-month jail term for filming a teenage family member with hidden cameras in her bedroom and bathroom is back in custody.

Todd Morrow, 45, is being held without bail after his arrest last week for an alleged probation violation.

Matt Lait, The Los Angeles Times

A man who was wrongfully convicted of killing his mother has reached a tentative settlement in his lawsuit against the city of Los Angeles in which he accused police detectives of fabricating evidence to put him behind bars for 26 years.

A spokesman for the city attorney’s office did not disclose the terms of the settlement on Monday, saying such information typically remains secret until the Los Angeles City Council votes to approve the agreement.

Krikor Ekizian, 29, had extensive criminal history
Your Central Valley

Eyewitness News has learned more about the man shot and killed by police early Sunday morning.
29 year old Krikor Ekizian had an extensive criminal history dating back to 2006.

Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer says, "We had had numerous contacts with him in terms of arrest and he had suffered from a mental illness."