Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Daily Correctional Clips



CDCR NEWS

Jessica Rogness, The Reporter

Prison officials from Vacaville and across the state turned out on Monday to honor a correctional officer who died at California Medical Facility (CMF) 35 years ago.

Albert “Al” Patch was killed in a knife attack after a fight between inmates broke out at CMF on Aug. 17, 1980. He was 44 years old.

Jessica Rogness, The Reporter

The Commission on Accreditation for Corrections accredited California Medical Facility (CMF) in Vacaville with the American Correctional Association (ACA) on Sunday.

CMF is one of 23 California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) prisons now accredited with the leading internationally recognized authority on corrections.

Tom Berg, OC Register

Troy Williams is talking on the phone about the first time he performed Shakespeare – as an inmate at San Quentin State Prison – when he interrupts himself.

“I see it right now,” he says as he drives to work, midway across a San Francisco Bay bridge.

“Every time I drive by San Quentin, those same feelings come up: happiness, sadness and fear all wrapped up in one.”
Williams, 48, served 18 years in state prison for robbery and kidnapping, and one thing that helped him regain his footing was studying Shakespeare.

CALIFORNIA PAROLE

Dana Bartholomew Daily News, Los Angeles

Lawmen across the state are seeking to block the parole of a man who'd indirectly helped murder a Los Angeles cop in front of his 6-year-old son in a hail of machine gun fire in front of a Canoga Park church school.

Unions representing Los Angeles police and California prosecutors this month joined with the widow of Detective Thomas C. Williams to attempt to block the recent parole of Voltaire Alphonse Williams (no relation), one of six men accused of killing the policeman 30 years ago to keep him from testifying in a murder trial.

CALIFORNIA INMATES


The thing you don’t expect about playing baseball in prison is that everyone is extremely friendly.

The entire roster of convicted felons who suited up for the San Quentin Giants on Thursday seemed genuinely grateful for the opportunity to play against some weekend warriors from the outside: Welcoming us and thanking us for coming upon our arrival in the prison yard, stopping by the visitors’ dugout for pleasantries during the game, and thanking us again before we took off to a nearby brewery for a postgame meal.