Friday, August 16, 2013

Daily Corrections Clips

CALIFORNIA INMATES

California grapples with inmate illness as hunger strike drags on
Sharon Bernstein, Reuters

(Reuters) - California prison officials are grappling with starvation-related ailments among hunger-striking prisoners who have refused to eat for nearly six weeks to protest the state's solitary confinement policies.

CALIFORNIA PAROLE


California Parole Population Decreasing Faster Than Prison Population

Charlotte Dean, IVN

After the California Legislature introduced their 2011 plan to realign inmate numbers with the population capacity of prisons, the Californian correctional system has seen drastic changes. One of the most visible changes in corrections, however, is within the parolee population.

Mother fights parole for her daughter’s murderer

John Michael Turnipseed was convicted in 1988 of raping and killing Amy Newman
Kerana Todorov, Napa Valley Register


Amy Newman was a seventh-grader at Redwood Middle School in November 1986 when she disappeared on a Sunday evening near her home in north Napa. A search party the next day found her body in the woods near Shelter Creek condos.

CDCR RELATED


Report: Hollywood stabbing death was preventable
Tami Abdollah, Associated Press


LOS ANGELES -- A woman's fatal stabbing on Hollywood's Walk of Fame may have been prevented if there had not been several systemic failures in the Los Angeles County Probation Department, according to a report obtained by The Associated Press on Thursday.


California Considers Drug Penalty Changes as U.S. Shifts Policy
Michael B. Marois, Bloomberg

California lawmakers are considering reducing penalties for minor drug offenses as the Obama administration said it’s taking a similar approach with federal sentences.

A measure before the state legislature would allow prosecutors to treat the cases as misdemeanors instead of felonies. That would reduce the amount of time convicts would spend behind bars and may help ease state prison crowding.

Calif Senate approves bill to end loophole in 1870s law that led to overturned rape conviction
Don Thompson, Associated Press


SACRAMENTO, California — The state Senate unanimously approved a bill on Thursday that would close a loophole in California law that resulted in a rape conviction being overturned because the woman was not married.

OPINION

Tom Hayden on how to end California's prison hunger strike

Both sides must set aside their profound differences and look at steps to relieve the worst elements of solitary confinement.
The Los Angeles Times


At least 300 inmates are now several weeks into a fast that could soon lead to organ failure and death for many of them. Events are moving rapidly, but as I write, nothing has been resolved. And, as California corrections chief Jeffrey Beard made clear recently in an Op-Ed for this newspaper, the sides are far apart.

Stitching Up a Paper Cut: Eric Holder Is 'Fixing' a Federal Problem at the Expense of the States
Adam Banner, The Huffington Post


So, United States Attorney General Eric Holder vowed to the American Bar Association's House of Delegates that the federal government will no longer impose "draconian mandatory minimums" for nonviolent, low-level drug offenders not tied to gangs or cartels. Holder called the federal government "coldly efficient" in incarcerating drug offenders, but said that mandatory minimum sentences are not in the best interest of public safety. Good for him.
 

Guest View: What causes the recidivism
Weldon Shaw, Red Bluff Daily News

During my time as an investigator for the California Department of Corrections, I had the opportunity to conduct many interviews with criminals wishing to debrief from their prospective gangs. As a debriefer, I have written numerous autobiographies of high profile criminals who were trying to separate themselves from their current life style. During these interviews I was able to obtain a lot of facts in regards to their social structure and what made them end up back in prison.