Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Daily Corrections Clips

CDCR NEWS

CDCR’s Lt. Acosta named Public Information Officer of the Year
InsideCDCR News

The California State Information Officers Council (SIOC) today named Lt. Christopher Acosta Public Information Officer of the Year during its annual awards ceremony recognizing excellence in state government communications.


CDCR conference focuses on treatment of female offenders

Dana Simas, Public Information Officer

California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s Female Offender Programs and Services (FOPS), along with researchers, corrections experts, college professors, and other stakeholders involved in the custody of female inmates, recently held the Gender Responsive Strategies Commission (GRSC) conference to discuss the programming, rehabilitation, and concerns related to female inmates.

REALIGNMENT
 


Slight realignment changes in Gov. Jerry Brown's new budget proposal

Andrew Edwards, The San Bernardino Sun

Gov. Jerry Brown's revised budget proposal offered a few changes to the state's controversial policy of requiring local governments to confine and monitor growing numbers of offenders, but for the most part, leaves the program in place. 


District Attorney Jackie Lacey endorses Mike Feuer for L.A. City Attorney

Elizabeth Hsing-Huei Chou, Daily News – Los Angeles


LOS ANGELES - District Attorney Jackie Lacey endorsed Mike Feuer in the race for Los Angeles city attorney today, saying she would rather work with him than with City Attorney Carmen Trutanich in tackling challenges associated with shifting prison populations.

CDCR RELATED


Jerry Brown 'aiming low' on pay for state employees

Jon Ortiz, The Sacramento Bee

During a press conference this morning to tout his latest state budget plan, Gov. Jerry Brown said that he wants to hold down state payroll costs as his administration bargains new pacts with nearly a dozen unions.


Poor health care moving from prison to jails

Mary Flynn, HealthyCal.org

California’s sweeping criminal justice reform plan was meant to sharply reduce the state’s prison population. But the changes may have also had the unintended consequence of passing along to county jails the biggest problem associated with overcrowding – poor health care.

Officials, community to meet today as manhunt continues

Catherine Wong, The Times-Standard

Law enforcement officials are holding a second community meeting at 5 p.m. today at Honeydew Elementary School to address concerns as the manhunt continues for Shane Miller in the Mattole Valley area one week after the ex-convict is suspected of killing his wife and two young daughters nearly 200 miles away.

Court hears testimony on possible release of mental patient who killed mother

Andy Furillo, The Sacramento Bee


Once again, California mental health officials are pushing to release into Sacramento a psychotic man who slashed and bludgeoned his mother to death in South Land Park nine years ago.

CALIFORNIA INMATES

 

When the third strike is no longer a strike
Nancy Mullane, KALW


Nearly 500 inmates serving life sentences have been freed from California prisons since voters passed Proposition 36 last November. The law authorized Superior Court judges throughout the state to free prisoners who had been sentenced to 25 years to life under the state’s original three-strikes law if their third crime, or “strike,” wasn’t serious or violent, and thus, not a third strike.